I am a graduate student at the University of Kansas. Russell Glacier, Greenland

An unflagging fascination with the plentiful diversity of the world's organisms and their distributions is what drew me to evolutionary biology and ecology. I have participated in diversity assessments of Kansas grassland plants and bees; Gulf of Mexico sharks, rays, and their parasites; and Andean highland and the Gobi Desert birds and their parasites. All of these projects have one thing in common—they were efforts to document the diversity of organisms and their locations before their habitats disappeared. Whether the habitat in question was grassland, desert, elfin forest, or the gut of an over-fished shark, conservation has always been an issue to which I try to relate my studies of biogeography.

All of these projects have one thing in common—they were efforts to document the diversity of organisms and their locations before their habitats disappeared. Whether the habitat in question was grassland, desert, elfin forest, or the gut of an over-fished shark, conservation has always been an issue to which I try to relate my studies of biogeography. One of the main themes of conservation biology is that the protection of habitat will ensure the protection of organisms within that habitat. Unfortunately, this model is complicated by and does not account for climate change. To protect biodiversity in the future, we must understand how climate change will affect the distribution of organisms and plan landscape and fisheries management accordingly. This is the goal of my research.